Houston Chemical Fire

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Houston Chemical Fire

Josh Calloni, Reporter

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Recently, in Houston, a chemical explosion caused a large fire that burned from March 31st to April 2nd after, killing one person.

It was not the first time that this particular plant caught fire. It was actually the second time in three weeks that it had done so. The plant, belonging to Houston based company KMCO, was eventually put out, but fire crews are not yet sure about what exactly lit the fire, but they have a theory. Their thoughts, according to CNN, that a transfer line to a tank holding isobutylene caught fire, and with the chemical being flammable, quickly got out of hand. The fire eventually spread to a storage building with more chemicals, igniting it further. From there, crews worked, and eventually put the fire out.

“I do not think a chemical fire would be the best thing to deal with if you live near a plant like that, it could force you out of your home for a long time,” sophomore Aiden Alderson said.

The surrounding areas were also affected by the fire. All residents within about a mile radius of the plant were told to have a shelter in place in case of evacuation due to the chemicals in the air. Luckily, however, the chemicals that were burned were all non toxic. Though, local schools have taken extra precautions with sealing doors and windows to keep their school and students as safe as possible.

“This has happened a lot lately, I wonder if it is something to do with the location of the chemicals in Texas, or a freak coincidence,” asked junior Cameron Fierge.

One person was killed in the fire, according to NBC news, and at least two others were taken to the hospital in critical condition. KMCO has agreed to pay for any damages caused, and pay an extra $75,000 to the city for their efforts, according to NBC. The fire is now contained fully, and it is to be seen what KMCO is doing to avoid another potential fire in the future.